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Dubai: The Most Visited Emirate In The World

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Look at the exciting world of the renounced greatest emirate city called Dubai. It is known for its crude oil mining but is perfectly specializing in tourism and site attractions. Not only did this emirate start from scratch but the United Arab Emirates made it to be one of the topmost visited countries in the world.

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It’s very fancy and expensive and many people are drawn to it like moths to a flame but it doesn’t draw me. My father who has a love for this country takes us there every December to see the sites and attractions Dubai is one of the major cities of the globe that has undergone prodigious transformation lately. From a sparsely populated land it has bechanced to one of the seven most populous countries of United Arab Emirates. The present population of Dubai is 1,413,000 which is estimated to upgrade to 1,845,000 by 2010.

Dubai is prospering at a vast pace and is exploiting all its resources to the utmost degree. Globalization has entrusted a mark on Dubai. The city has embodied itself as a viable downtown. It is alluring worldwide commerce and is letting out a great deal of business. Dubai is one of the major cities of the globe that has undergone prodigious transformation lately. From a sparsely populated land it has bechanced to one of the seven most populous countries of United Arab Emirates. The present population of Dubai is 1,413,000 which is estimated to upgrade to 1,845,000 by 2010.

Dubai is prospering at a vast pace and is exploiting all its resources to the utmost degree. Globalization has entrusted a mark on Dubai. The city has embodied itself as a viable downtown. It is alluring worldwide commerce and is letting out a great deal of business. Dubai apart from fetching trade is becoming increasingly popular as a holiday spot. From its serene beaches to its aquamarine life, everything bestows an extraordinary effect. It presents the atypical the amalgamation of commercialization, luxury, trade, holiday, and leisure. From the skyscrapers to the shopping malls, everything imparts Dubai an incredibly fresh feel.

‘Burj Al Arab’ is an inimitable hotel, it is peerless and the only 7-star hotel in the entire world. It is enormously enrapturing and fascinating making it the key attractions in the city. It has befallen a major underscore of the world.

Another viable creation is the ‘Palm Jumeirah’ which is the palm-shaped isle consisting of resorts that are off-cost. The distinctive shape of the palm tree symbolizes its identity and the resort culture with dazzling landscapes lends it the splendor. Next in line is the ‘World of Houses’ which is a luxurious island enclosing in the outward appearance of the world map. Its prominent feature is the diminutive form of the earth.

With the innovation in the tourist spots, Dubai also provides connectivity through the airport which is centrally linked to the city. This airdrome is the world’s largest airstrip. It runs through the locus of the city linking it to the major cities of the world.

Rendering to these gaze-gifts, the tourist footfall increased from 1. 08 million to 5. 4 million in the last decade which means a growth rate of 16% per year. This annual growth rate is almost 3 times of the world’s growth rate in tourism. Out of the 16% growth rate in the last decade, 54% was in the previous five years and it is projected to continue and even increase.

The crime rate in Dubai is as low as 0. 5-1% over every 10,000 people. One of the foremost reasons for that could be the unforgiving punishment for the offenses. This excogitates Dubai as a safe city to subsist.

Dubai offers a tax-free income and possessing an estate entitles for a complimentary life stay in the city. With all the commencement in technology and commerce, Dubai has magnanimously urbanized in the past decade. It does not only proffer property or business prospects but also furnishes with numerous incentives which give it an edge over the other cities of the world.

The world became acquainted with Dubai only a few years ago. The city that launched a thousand magazine features was presented to Westerners as many things: Rich, strange, tacky, and threatening. But most of all, it was presented as new. The instant global metropolis with a “skyline on crack” captivated the world with record-setting skyscrapers, indoor ski slopes, and a stunningly diverse population. With 96 percent of its population foreign-born, Dubai makes even New York City’s diversity — 37 percent of New Yorkers are immigrants — seem mundane. As a pair of American observers put it, Dubai is a city where “everyone and everything in it — its luxuries, laborers, architects, accents, even its aspirations — was flown in from someplace else. ” But for all the breathless coverage of Dubai’s supposedly unprecedented emergence, the only truly new thing about Dubai is the “flown in” part. Dubai was touted as a new phenomenon, but it is just the most recent iteration of a far older one. For 300 years, instant cities modeled on the West have been built in the developing world in audacious attempts to wrench a lagging region into the modern world. While the rise of these global crossroads cities was once checked by the speed of ocean liners and locomotives, today their growth is powered by intercontinental jets that can move a passenger from any major city in the world to any other in a single day. So while the city of Dubai is new, the idea of Dubai is not. It’s just that in the age of jet-powered globalization, the idea can achieve liftoff as never before.

As the locomotive built Daniel Burnham’s Chicago, the jetliner built [United Arab Emirates Prime Minister] Sheikh Mohammed’s Dubai. In 1974, Sheikh Rashid tasked the young Mohammed with overseeing the growth of Dubai International Airport. In the 1980s, Mohammed tapped British Airways veteran Maurice Flanagan to launch Emirates airline, which would become an archetype of the Dubai model: A state-owned company managed by Western experts that would thrive in open international competition.

In the early years, Emirates just linked Dubai to its surrounding region. Saudis and Iranians came to shop and enjoy the libertine nightlife banned in their native theocracies. Entrepreneurial Russians arrived to empty Dubai’s store shelves and resell the items back home during the chaos of the Soviet collapse and post-Soviet free fall. By 1990, Emirates was flying to major hubs like London, Frankfurt, and Singapore, taking advantage of the fact that most of the world’s population lives within a reasonable flying time of the city-state. As Emirates grew, it became a kind of octopus, grabbing ever more far-flung parts of the world and drawing them to Dubai. Lured by the prospect of tax-free salaries, some of the international businessmen who visited, stayed. By 1995, roughly 20,000 Britons lived in the emirate, enjoying the familiarity of a former colony as the first wave of expatriate “Dubai landers” that would become a flood of First World consultants, architects, and bankers in the new century. Of course, aviation in the world’s least stable region could never just be about route maps and stewardess uniforms (as the UAE has no anti-discrimination law, by company policy, Emirates prefers not to hire male flight attendants). Dubai was a common refueling stop for hijacked jets, and Sheikh Mohammed became one of the world’s most experienced hostage negotiators. In dealings with fearsome groups including the (pre-Oslo) Palestine Liberation Organization, Japanese Red Army and Baader-Meinhof Gang, an underground cell of West German radicals, Mohammed never lost a passenger.

Dubai is a melting point of culture bringing in elements from various European and Asian influences while at the same time staying true to their Arabian heritage. Most of these influences can be seen within their various architecture, cuisine, and tourist attractions. Often seen as a giant tourist attraction, Dubai is home to one of the most exquisite and eye catching tourists sites around, some of which being the wild wadi water park which is one of my families favorites and the Dubai mall aquarium where there is an array of aquatic life raised humanely in a safe environment.

Another well-known tourist attraction is the Burj Khalifa. It is Dubai’s most important asset as it is the tallest structure in the world. “Soaring over the city at an impressive 2,716 feet (828 meters) and boasting 200 stories (160 habitable), the $1. 5 billion Burj Khalifa project was unveiled by Dubai’s ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum in January 2010. At the peak of construction, more than 12,000 international workers were on site per day logging a collective 22 million man-hours during the six years it took to complete. The Burj Khalifa is twice the height of New York’s Empire State Building and three times as tall as the Eiffel Tower in Paris. It even surpassed Taiwan’s Taipei 101, which at 1,667 feet (508m) had held the world title since it opened in 2004. Laid end to end, the Burj Khalifa’s pieces would stretch over a quarter of the way around the world. ”

As advanced as Dubai seems, its ruler has even brighter plans for the future, with tests for futuristic means of transport such as drone taxis, driverless buses and a Hyperloop train already being underway. The official UAE website states that “Dubai Autonomous Transportation Strategy aims to transform 25 per cent of the total transportation in Dubai to autonomous mode by 2030. The strategy is expected to bring AED 22 billion in annual economic revenues in several sectors by reducing transportation costs, carbon emissions and accidents, and raising the productivity of individuals as well as saving hundreds of millions of hours wasted in conventional transportation. ”

In conclusion, Dubai is a beautiful, ever growing city that is slowly but surely becoming the epicenter of tourist attractions and economic development. As a city I believe a lot of other countries can learn from it and develop themselves so as to become developed and futuristic as well.

Works Cited

  1. About the UAE. n. d. 9 December 2019.
  2. Brook, Daniel. ‘How Dubai became Dubai. ‘ NEXT CITY (2013): 32. Internet.
  3. Corder, Josh. The top 10 upcoming future projects in Dubai. 22 November 2019. document. 9 December 2019.
  4. Julien, Selina. Dubai’s Burj Khalifa: Inside the world’s tallest building. 7th May 2018. article. 9th December 2019.
  5. Reporter, Property. ‘Key of Dubai. ‘ (2018 ): 2. Internet.
  6. Thani, Rabi Al. ‘United Arab Emirates. ‘ Khaleej Times (2019): 3. Internet.
10 December 2020

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